The Gumpi (Dunwich) Draft Master Plan

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The Queensland Government has prepared a draft master plan that outlines a shared, long-term vision for the future of Gumpi (Dunwich). The draft master plan reflects community and stakeholder feedback previously received.

Consultation on the draft master plan has now closed and all feedback will be reviewed to help inform the final master plan.

The implementation strategies included within the master plan are not currently programmed by any entity. Responsibility for the implementation strategies will be determined subsequent to formal adoption of the master plan.

The draft master plan is one of the 23 Queensland Government initiatives under the Minjerribah

The Queensland Government has prepared a draft master plan that outlines a shared, long-term vision for the future of Gumpi (Dunwich). The draft master plan reflects community and stakeholder feedback previously received.

Consultation on the draft master plan has now closed and all feedback will be reviewed to help inform the final master plan.

The implementation strategies included within the master plan are not currently programmed by any entity. Responsibility for the implementation strategies will be determined subsequent to formal adoption of the master plan.

The draft master plan is one of the 23 Queensland Government initiatives under the Minjerribah Futures program (formerly the North Stradbroke Island Economic Transition Strategy), which aims to diversify and expand the island's economy.

The master plan aims to:

  • identify areas for future residential, commercial, community, environmental and industrial land uses
  • explore ways to better tell the Quandamooka story to visitors
  • identify necessary upgrades to infrastructure and services to improve liveability
  • acknowledge and respect cultural, social and environmental values
  • enhance the town’s role and appeal as a tourism-friendly destination and gateway to Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island).

Vision

The vision for the Gumpi Master Plan is:

Gumpi (Dunwich) consolidates its role as the gateway to the environmental and cultural sanctuary of North Stradbroke Island (Minjerribah). Sustainable foundations support a strong local economy with opportunities.

Strategies

Community feedback and technical analysis has identified a range of priorities for Gumpi and guided the development of four overarching strategies designed to guide projects and achieve the master plan’s objectives.

  1. A memorable and authentic place
  2. A thriving and sustainable place
  3. A green and natural sanctuary
  4. A connected and legible place

Catalyst projects

To realise the vision and objectives set out in the master plan, the following six catalyst projects have been selected because of their ability to best achieve the desired social, economic, and cultural prosperity for Gumpi (Dunwich). These projects will, over time, dramatically reposition the township of Gumpi (Dunwich) and steer it towards achieving the vision of the master plan.

  1. Upgrades to ferry transport infrastructure
  2. Land use and economic revitalisation
  3. Township wayfinding and navigation
  4. Foreshore strategy and upgrades
  5. Day trip experience
  6. Car parking formalisation

Have your say

Community consultation on the draft master plan has now closed. We are now reviewing the feedback to guide the development of the final master plan.

To stay informed about the master plan and to hear about opportunities to get involved please register for updates.

Gumpi vs Goompi: the spelling of Gumpi in the master plan is consistent with the Jandai Language Dictionary. The master plan was updated to Gumpi in 2020 to reflect the spelling in the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation’s annual report. The annual report can be accessed here: http://www.qyac.net.au/docs/QYAC_Annual_Report_2020.pdf

Is there anything else you would like to share regarding the master plan?

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

On browsing the master plan, it seems that whoever is responsible has no knowledge of the residents, visitors or history of Dunwich. Dunwich contains the oldest European presence in Qld. Some features show this in the convict causeway, the oldest European structure in Queensland, and the underground entrance to the soldier,s barracks, both of which seem to have disappeared in the master plan. A hole in the road on this convict built causeway could not be fixed for years because of its heritage status. After this, is the benevolent asylum where some structures still exist and only recently one of the buildings became qld heritage listed . Also, recently the Redland Shire wanted to demolish the Harold Walker Jetty. Protests against this caused the shire to change it,s mind and fix it up. The master plan seems to have abolished this jetty.
If one day visits to Dunwich is one aim of the master plan, the history of Dunwich is one of the interesting features that should be highlighted.
In encouraging day trippers, has there been any thought in to where these people may park on the mainland for the day. Parking at Cleveland is becoming harder and harder.
Making The Main Street of Dunwich car free, will greatly impact the businesses there and could lead to their closure, as people park and pop in. Not possible if cars not permitted. Also what is the impact on other streets if this street is closed.
The master plans seems to be encouraging cycling. As Amity and Point Lookout are only 20 kms from Dunwich, many cyclists would want to ride to these places also. As it is there are more and more cyclists on the road to Pont Lookout., but the road is unsuitable to cyclists. It is narrow and has many blind curves, so dangerous. As a matter of urgency, I think this road should be made cycling friendly before money is spent elsewhere.
I hope there is more liaison with the local community in the future, and not have another 'Whale on the Hill' fiasco, where money is just wasted due to the lack of concern of the locals.
May commonsense prevail.
Bb

Bb about 1 year ago

Hi Pigeon,
The draft plan proposes that the Mitchell Park area (where the Community Arts and Pottery Club is located) could be rehabilitated and developed to provide for mix of housing product, including affordable housing, housing for the elderly, short-term accommodation and other complementary uses. This does not necessitate the removal of the Community Arts and Pottery Club site.

Planning Comms about 1 year ago

Hi Kathleen, thank you for your feedback. Potential funding options for projects will be considered in the preparation of the final plan’s implementation strategy and may be sought through new and existing funding initiatives for economic recovery, infrastructure delivery and public/private investment.
The draft plan proposes to improve and promote recreational boating around Dunwich by improving marine infrastructure that supports recreational boating activities.

Planning Comms about 1 year ago

Hi Graeme, thank you for your feedback. We are working with ferry operators and public transport operators to better understand the different needs of transport users in Dunwich and across the island and how these needs can be accommodated in the master plan. The departure of Sibelco from the site adjacent to the current Junner Street terminal provides significant expansion opportunities that would allow for additional parking and public transport services. There are currently conflicts between pedestrians, boats, bus set down and private vehicles at the One Mile site, which is also surrounded by culturally and environmentally sensitive uses, and the site cannot be altered significantly to address these conflicts. The draft master plan acknowledges the heritage values of the convict causeway and that the causeway will be a key feature of any future terminal development and is not to be removed.

Planning Comms about 1 year ago

Hi SaveMilesStreetKoalas,
Thank you for your feedback. Please note that the Miles Street Reserve is not within the draft Gumpi (Dunwich) Master Plan area, being at Amity Point. The site was rezoned under a temporary local planning instrument (TLPI) late last year, however this TLPI does not remove environmental considerations should any development be proposed. For information on zoning changes or environmental considerations at the site, please contact Redland City Council.

Planning Comms about 1 year ago

The master plans name is questionable (Gumpie is not a name I recognise as belonging to Dunwich or the local aboriginal language) and urgently needs to be rectified. I agree with some of the sentiment of the previous submission. The local community seems to been seen as irrelevant in this master plan. This is easily demonstrated by the following points. A significant proportion of the township including Rainbow and Illawong Crescents and 2 Mile are not included. This is I estimate at least 50% of the townships population. The local pottery which is a community hub developed 40 years ago by local volunteers and now supported by even more locals is not recognized and ceases to exist under this plan. The Council building near the barge terminal that was the tourist information but originally developed as the local arts and craft center also doesn't rate a mention. This plan in my view fails to recognize the community or understand the fabric that ties the local residents together and in so doing fails to adequately plan for its future. It is no surprise that Minjerribah Futures has stumbled on its first major initiative for the island on the headland. Isn't it time the Queensland Government stopped wasting Queenslanders money, went back to the drawing board with the Council planners and started talking to the people who actually live on the island?

goompie about 1 year ago

This process has been a sham from day one. What is needed is an appropriate co-design process that puts Traditional Owner RESIDENTS and other residents of the island at the centre of decision-making.
The voices and visions of the local community have been locked out of this process. The methodology you have applied for this sham 'consultation' is inappropriate. Online surveys have got to be the absolute worst way to engage with Aboriginal people. What about engaging local resident elders and youth in a proper structured conversation about what they want for the future of their town?
In my opinion you need to build your department's cultural capability, beginning immediately with the people who are running this Goompi Master Sham.
Instead of doing the right thing and engaging properly and respectfully with the local community, your department seems intent on shoving the Queensland government's pre-determined agenda down resident's throats. A proper partnership approach with the local Aboriginal community and broader community, based on the current Qld Gvt policy on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement and Partnerships would be a good place to start.

*Anonymous Screen Name* about 1 year ago

I have no opposition to redeveloping the islands future around sensitive tourism ie low impact however there is a reserve (gazetted reserve) in Miles St Amity Point which is an incredibly well known koala hotspot that is also filled with old growth trees with hollows etc full of eagles, parrots and cockatoos and bandicoots, echidnas and kangaroos which has been earmarked for bulldozing.
Surely there are other less sensitive areas that can be developed.

SaveMilesStreetKoalas about 1 year ago

To anybody that truly cares about nature and the environment.

I have been aware of planning changes to Amity, Dunwich and Pt Lookout. My mother has cared for the Miles Street Reserve in Miles Street Amity Point. She nurtures the native trees on the reserve and removes weeds, litter and waste and has an arrangement with council to collect stockpiles. My mother has done this for about 30 years and the reserve was meant to be forever protected. I understand it is to be split for housing. The small reserve is a very necessary link, corridor and wildlife reserve very well known by locals and tourist operators alike as being full of koalas, echidnas, bandicoots, kangaroos and bird nest habitat. Your master plans and the Quandamooka/Minjerribah Aspirational Plans have it going before the bulldozer. This small parcel is of immense natural value but do any of you ever get out of the office to see it or even ask the question whether it should be protected or not. General adage for conservation is to protect what we have, If the aboriginal custodians and government want to truly exhibit custodianship, stewardship and care then this parcel must be saved. To do otherwise is short sighted and criminal in disregard and contempt of nature.

SaveMilesStreetKoalas about 1 year ago

Need more focus on preserving nature.
eradicate feral cats and dogs for one.

SaveMilesStreetKoalas about 1 year ago

Removed by moderator.

SaveMilesStreetKoalas about 1 year ago

I have been aware of planning changes to Amity, Dunwich and Pt Lookout. My mother has cared for the Miles Street Reserve in Miles Street Amity Point. She nurtures the native trees on the reserve and removes weeds, litter and waste and has an arrangement with council to collect stockpiles. My mother has done this for about 30 years and the reserve was meant to be forever protected. I understand it is to be split for housing. The small reserve is a very necessary link, corridor and wildlife reserve very well known by locals and tourist operators alike as being full of koalas, echidnas, bandicoots, kangaroos and bird nest habitat. Your master plans and the Quandamooka/Minjerribah Aspirational Plans have it going before the bulldozer. This small parcel is of immense natural value but do any of you ever get out of the office to see it or even ask the question whether it should be protected or not. General adage for conservation is to protect what we have, If the aboriginal custodians and government want to truly exhibit custodianship, stewardship and care then this parcel must be saved. To do otherwise is short sighted and criminal in disregard and contempt of nature.
Scott B

SaveMilesStreetKoalas about 1 year ago

I have been aware of planning changes to Amity, Dunwich and Pt Lookout. My mother has cared for the Miles Street Reserve in Miles Street Amity Point. She nurtures the native trees on the reserve and removes weeds, litter and waste and has an arrangement with council to collect stockpiles. My mother has done this for about 30 years and the reserve was meant to be forever protected. I understand it is to be split for housing. The small reserve is a very necessary link, corridor and wildlife reserve very well known by locals and tourist operators alike as being full of koalas, echidnas, bandicoots, kangaroos and bird nest habitat. Your master plans and the Quandamooka/Minjerribah Aspirational Plans have it going before the bulldozer. This small parcel is of immense natural value but do any of you ever get out of the office to see it or even ask the question whether it should be protected or not. General adage for conservation is to protect what we have, If the aboriginal custodians and government want to truly exhibit custodianship, stewardship and care then this parcel must be saved. To do otherwise is short sighted and criminal in disregard and contempt of nature.

SaveMilesStreetKoalas about 1 year ago

Dunwich locals, en masse, choose to use the Straddy Flyer. (It is family owned, close to the centre of the population including those north of One Mile). Why the focus on the massive Junner St ferry terminal (erasing the convict causeway completely)? For folk who use that terminal, Dunwich is just a blip on the way to millionaire row of Pt Lookout.

Graeme about 1 year ago

2 questions I would like answered

How is this project being funded?
What are the impact to boaties

Kathleen about 1 year ago

What will happen to the community pottery and why is it not on the plan?

Pigeon about 1 year ago
Page last updated: 29 Jul 2022, 08:57 AM